Ten Life Lessons from Shakespeare

James-Cagney-and-Anita-Louise-in-A-Midsummer-Nights-Dream-1935

We all know Shakespeare often stole borrowed ideas from older works, so when I saw Richard Glover’s Ten things I learned from Shakespeare, I just knew I had to re-work these. I am not sure how old his list is, as I found it on The Reduced Shakespeare Company’s Facebook page. Hey, credit to whom credit is due. Check out their page for the original list.

And now, I give you my…

Ten life lesson from Shakespeare

  1. Always wear gloves when stabbing a person, as blood tends to stain one’s hands.
  2. No matter how tempting, never accept a free ticket to a foreign country from your new step-dad, even if he’s always been your uncle.
  3. Before completely losing it, calmly take your unconscious girlfriend’s pulse or at least check to see if she is breathing.
  4. If you find yourself marooned on an island, befriend the natives. You never know if they will turn on you
  5. No matter how busy you may be (like getting ready for a wedding), if a cop stops by your house to share some gossip, listen to him. It may save you from an embarrassing situation later on.
  6. Make sure you always know where your handkerchief is. Especially if it is a gift from your husband.
  7. Speaking of husbands. If your wife starts agreeing with everything you say, face it, she’s on to you.
  8. Never take financial or employments advise from a homeless woman, especially if she has two friends snickering while you talk.
  9. If you wake up feeling like an ass, you’re probably an ass.
  10. Guys, if she says “it’s much ado about nothing”, trust me, it’s much ado about something.

Your turn. I want to hear something you’ve learned from Will.

Author: sarij

I'm a writer, lifelong bibliophile ,and researcher. I hold a Bachelors in Humanities & History and a Master's in Humanities. When I'm not reading or talking about Shakespeare or history, you can usually find me in the garden discussing science or politics with my cat.

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