Sari’s 37 silly reasons to Celebrate Shakespeare

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As we celebrated last year’s 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth, I presented you with a few fun lists. I wasn’t sure I wanted to repeat myself this year; I thought one would be enough, but after reading Shakespeare’s Globe’s 37 Reasons to Celebrate Shakespeare , I was inspired to come up with one more. While many of the Globe’s reason’s are serious, I decided to come up with a list of 37 silly reasons to celebrate Shakespeare; some not as obvious as others. I’d love to see more, so I challenge my fellow Shakespeare bloggers to come up with their own 37 reasons to Celebrate Shakespeare.

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Sari’s 37 silly reasons to Celebrate Shakespeare
  • We wouldn’t have anything to compare our lovers to.
  • He makes us think about the hard questions in life. Does a rose by any other name actually smell as sweet?
  • The only western playwright to use the word honorificabilitudinitatibus correctly in a sentence.
  • To be or not to be is still the question
  • He gave us countless blathering foolish wits and conversely, some loquacious witty fools.
  • He makes shipwrecks seem like a lot of fun.
  • He gave us daddy issues way before Freud invented mommy issues.
  • He left us with some great names. Let’s be honest; we are all a little disappointed that we left college without making friends with cool last names like Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
  • He gave Kenneth Branagh a purpose in life.
  • He reminds us to always treat a stranger as if he were our brother.
  • 400 years later we still don’t have a better sonnet writer.
  • 400 years later the only people who know the difference between a poem and a sonnet are poets and Shakespeare fanatics.
  • Three words: Gnome & Juliet.
  • Best stage direction ever: exit, pursued by a bear.
  • He gave us teenage angst, extreme teenage angst.
  • We all now know that when presented with three boxes, always take the least desirable looking one.
  • He legitimized the breaking of the fourth wall.
  • Two words: Folger Library.
  • He gave us some of the world’s best female characters and one of the world’s worst male characters (I’m looking at you Iago).
  • He gave us the best lines in all of the theater. Oh, we argue over which ones they are, but not who wrote them.
  • He taught us that geography doesn’t really matter.
  • He taught us never to give our children their inheritance before we die.
  • A lot of us wouldn’t know what to do without our Sundays. #ShakespearSunday.
  • Without him, errors would not be so comical.
  • Quoting Shakespeare will impress your date, even if they don’t know the hell you are talking about.
  • Without him would anyone really care about the Ides of March?
  • Hamlet didn’t need eyeliner to be Goth.
  • Let’s face it, a lot of people went into acting just so they could speak the speech.
  • Let’s face it, only real Shakespeare fans will get #29.
  • Without him, Harold Bloom would still be wondering who invented the human.
  • Without him no amount of explaining would make the skull on your bookshelf any less creepy.
  • He gave us much ado about everything.
  • He taught us that it’s best to avoid talking to that small group of women we encounter on the road.
  • He taught us excessive hand washing might be a sign of more than just OCD.
  • College students would be agonizing over Chaucer right now.
  • One word; Dogberry.
  • He added over 1700 new words to our collective vocabulary and enriched our language. A better speech was never spoke before (Love’s Labour’s Lost).

 

He would drown the stage with tears
And cleave the general ear with horrid speech;
Make mad the guilty and appal the free,
Confound the ignorant, and amaze indeed
The very faculties of eyes and ears.
(Hamlet)

Author: sarij

I'm a writer, lifelong bibliophile ,and researcher. I hold a Bachelors in Humanities & History and a Master's in Humanities. When I'm not reading or talking about Shakespeare or history, you can usually find me in the garden discussing science or politics with my cat.

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